African countries

US to increase support for vaccination in 11 African countries

NAIROBI, KENYA - 2022/02/03: A healthcare worker administers the Pfizer vaccine to a resident of Dagoretti in Nairobi during a nationwide mass vaccination campaign.

NAIROBI, KENYA – 2022/02/03: A healthcare worker administers the Pfizer vaccine to a resident of Dagoretti in Nairobi during a nationwide mass vaccination campaign.
Photo: John Ochieng/SOPA Images/LightRocket (Getty Images)

As the Omicron push continues to subside in America and restrictions are removed, many seek to prevent the next variant. While wealthy Western countries have had chances to do booster shots, vaccine inequality has left less wealthy countries behind.

As the New York Times underlines: “Currently, only 12% of the African population – or 168 million people – have been fully vaccinated, according to the WHO, with Africa accounting for only 3.5% of the 10.3 billion doses administered worldwide. .

Additionally, the New York Times reports that the United States will increase its vaccine assistance to 11 African countries in sub-Saharan Africa – Angola, Eswatini, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Lesotho, Nigeria, etc. the Biden Administrationthe plan for “intensive financial, technical and diplomatic support” is through the Global Vaccine Access Initiative. The World Health Organization has also started sending 42 experts to at least 18 African countries facing challenges in administering vaccines – another challenge with misinformation that is hamper efforts.

This effort will be based “on the burden of Covid-19 on their populations, the capacity of their health systems, their willingness to rapidly deliver vaccine doses in the absence of supply constraints, and their ability to effectively deploy vaccines.” additional US investment”. The vaccine rate must increase to six times the current amount if the continent hopes to reach the 70% target set for mid-2022.

Even today, the The WHO announced by a press release that six African countries, including Kenya, Nigeria and Senegal, will receive the technology needed to produce mRNA vaccines.

President Cyril Ramaphosa of South Africa welcomed the collective push.

From the New York Times:

“This is an initiative that will allow us to manufacture our own vaccines and that, for us, is very important,” Ramaphosa said in a statement. “It means mutual respect, mutual recognition of what we can all bring to the party, investing in our savings, investing in infrastructure and in many ways giving back to the continent.”